men go to battle, women wage war

“The bird sings as if to say that delight is easy, for those who desire it” 


kingmaking:

make me choose: anon asked george plantagenet or juan borgia (x)


marthajefferson:

Elizabeth died on February 11, 1503 on her 37th birthday, trying to give her husband another son [but gave birth to a short lived daughter]. Henry VII would never truly recover from his wife’s death. While the entire nation grieved the loss of their Queen, Henry ordered his council to prepare the Queen’s funeral and went into seclusion. Her “departing was as heavy and dolorous as to the King’s Highness as hath been seen or heard of”. “Solemn dirges and Masses of requiems” were heard, Henry ordered 636 masses to be offered for her soul in London alone on the day after her death —her State Funeral was one of the most lavish ever seen. He ordered clothing in blue and black, blue being the royal colour of mourning, and even had his books bound in blue velvet.
It would be more than a year before the King’s grief would begin to subside ; shortly after her death he became seriously ill and was close to death, his mother fled to his side to nurse him herself. He emerged from his illness a changed man.
The Tower of London, where Elizabeth had died giving birth, was abandoned as a royal residence. He considered other marriages [with realms of Spain or Italy], but never did remarry. It might be overly-romantic to think his heart never mended, but Henry VII honoured his wife every year until his own death. Every February 11th a requiem mass would be sung, the bells would be tolled and 100 candles would burn in her honour. Henry retained the services of Elizabeth’s minstrels, who played for him at every New Year celebration up to his death.

                                   — Elizabeth of York and her Kings, Olga Hughes (2013)


kingmaking:

make me choose: two anons asked isabel or anne neville (x)


sansaregina:

You will have to play your cards right.

make me choose // borgiapope asked: elizabeth woodville or jacquetta of luxembourg



cahierdecoloriages:

but i don’t forget and i don’t forgive

cahierdecoloriages:

but i don’t forget and i don’t forgive



sansaregina:

make me choose // kingslaayer asked: richard iii or henry vii edward iv

An extremely capable and daring military commander, Edward destroyed the House of Lancaster in a series of spectacular military victories; he was never defeated on the field of battle. Despite his occasional (if serious) political setbacks — usually at the hands of his great Machiavellian rival, Louis XI of France — Edward was a popular and very able king. While he lacked foresight and was at times cursed by bad judgement, he possessed an uncanny understanding of his most useful subjects, and the vast majority of those who served him remained unwaveringly loyal until his death. 

Domestically, Edward’s reign saw the restoration of law and order in England (indeed, his royal motto was modus et ordo, or “method and order”). […] Interestingly, Edward was also a shrewd and successful businessman and merchant, heavily investing in several corporations within the City of London. He also made the duchy of Lancaster property of the crown, which it still is today. During the reign of Henry there had been corruption in the exchequer. Edward made his household gain more control over finances and even investigated old records to see payments had been made. Documents of the exchequer show him sending letters threatening officials if they did not pay money. His proprerties earned large amounts of money for the crown. (x)